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Colour Study Part V: Purple

Updated: Oct 12, 2018

Supernatural Powers: Learn how to use it


I am doing an in-depth look into colour based on the freshness of early Spring, through the hot reds and golden grasses of Summer, Autumn's colours of old age to the neutral tones of Winter. We'll look at natures colour palette and how there are several ways to get from one colour to another, how light and shadow can change a colour, tints, tones and shades and the importance of colour associations and harmonies.

I love purple! Whether it is because it is harmoniously balanced between the stability of blue and energetic red or the opulent extravagance this colour conjures, but purple seems to offer more than any other colour. Rarely found in nature, it is unlikely that our ancient ancestors ever saw purple, which perhaps subconsciously contributes to the supernatural ambience associated with purple through the ages. Perhaps the more regular occurrence of this luxurious colour in the supernatural world, over the physical world adds to it's mysticism.

Unlike the common, earthly ochre colours, purple didn't occur as a dye until 1900 BC, where the extract from 12,000 shellfish would make just 1.5 grams of pure dye. Due to the source and skills to acquire, Mediterranean civilisations associate purple to emperors and popes, with the Japanese calling it 'Imperial Purple'.

Scientifically purple is powerfully visible in rainbows due to the wavelength of it's electromagnetic energy, which is very close to X-rays and gamma rays. It has been shown that too much purple in your surrounds can cause impatience, arrogance and irritability, whereas carefully chosen purple accents can be calming and enhance creativity and ambition.


When using purple, spectacularly rich shadows can be created by adding dark blues or deep magenta, whilst to create warm high-lights, pale grey-blue or dusty, rose pinks will compliment with exemplary results. Lighter

shades of purple such as amethyst or lavender create nostalgic romanticism whilst adding pinks will create a feminine montage. Light purple and yellow is a popular combination for children or baby products. Bright purples such as magenta or violet denote richness and elitism, as previously discussed, though dark purples, like mulberry or grape, reflect sadness or frustration. particularly in Italy, Thailand, Brazil and the UK where it is considered a colour of mourning.


There is a lot more to purple than I could have imagined, and will continue to experiment with it. Despite being the hardest colour to recognise, it is renown for creating calmness- maybe the time it takes to see purple helps us slow down a little? I believe learning to understand purple will help balance the mind through increased intuition. Curiously, the Crown Chakra (the tantric Buddhism and Hinduism's understanding of energy flow through the body), which governs the nervous system and brain, is purple. Think Purple Heart (US military medal for bravery), Deep Purple (1970's iconic rock band), and Purple Rain (pop star Prince's 1984 epic tune) and it is all good!


I know times are changing It's time we all reach out For something new, that means you too ........

Prince (1984)




Research sourced from:

www.colour-wheel-pro.com

www.colourmatters.com

www. colourpsychology.org

https://digitalsynopsis.com/design/color-thesaurus-correct-names-of-shades/




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